How to Develop a Writing Process

Whether you’re a fiction or nonfiction writer, developing a writing process will make you a more prolific writer and improve your craft. With a process in place, the act of writing becomes like any other routine task, such as getting out of bed or showering. It’s no longer a question whether you’re going to sit down and write—and that’s a powerful thing. Here’s how you can do that.

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Writing a Book? Identify Your Reader Right Away

The idea of a client avatar doesn’t just apply to big business. If you want to be a successful author, you need to know who you’re writing for; you need to understand your ideal reader. This is especially important for the kind of nonfiction book that helps a reader solve a problem or reach a goal. How can you help if you don’t know who you’re helping? You need an ideal reader profile.

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Let’s Eat Mom

To comma or not to comma, that is the question. This seemingly insignificant punctuation mark causes more confusion in the lives of writers, editors, and all who work in publications or with web content than all other punctuation marks combined. This blog reviews some basic rules for the use of the comma, so you can brush up on your usage of the pesky comma.

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Don’t Skip Critique!

If you want to publish a polished, well-crafted piece of writing, you’ll likely need feedback to help guide your revisions. Most authors, however, aren’t ready for a professional editor after the first draft. Instead, join a writer’s critique group! They’re free, they’ll make you a better writer, and they’ll help build your network. Here’s how.

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Caution: This Article Contains Sensitive Content about Trigger Warnings

Writing a memoir, novel, essay, magazine article, or blog post sometimes requires authors to tackle some tough topics, including content that might be psychologically or emotionally difficult to read, especially to those who have experienced a trauma. How do we balance realistic depictions or discussions of challenging content with the needs of readers who could potentially be traumatized? Trigger warnings might—or might not—help. Here’s how.

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